Common Questions

  1. What is a RecruitMilitary Opportunity Expo?

    A RecruitMilitary Opportunity Expo is an event where transitioning military, veterans, and their spouses can meet with recruiters from dozens of companies. These events are free for attendees. To learn more, watch this video from one of our expos in Cincinnati, Ohio.

  2. Who are the exhibitors?

    RecruitMilitary Opportunity Expos are enhanced job fairs or career fairs with four kinds of exhibitors.

    1. Employers
    2. Franchisors
    3. Educational institutions
    4. Veterans associations and service agencies
  3. What if my only interest is getting a job?

    Even if you are not here to discuss continuing education, we recommend that you talk with the education recruiters.

    • Today’s institutions deliver learning opportunities in many ways other than traditional, full-time, daytime classes on a campus. So a few minutes of conversation may lead to an unexpected continuing-education solution that is right for you.
    • In addition, most of the institutions at our Expos are also large employers and might have job openings at a campus near you.
    • We have similar advice for job seekers who have not been thinking of going into business for themselves. Franchise opportunities are available in a tremendous variety of fields. Financing may be easier than you think, with surprising discounts for veterans.
  4. Are the employers actually hiring?

    Yes, and they have a number of different priorities and requirements. As a result, their recruiters interact with job seekers in a variety of ways.

    • Some recruiters have “hot fills,” job openings that they need to fill immediately. If you happen to qualify for a hot fill, the recruiter may take you to a separate area for a one-on-one interview.
    • Other recruiters are looking for transitioning and veteran military to apply for jobs that are almost always open. That kind of recruiter might ask for a paper résumé and/or give you a business card and ask you to call.
    • Some recruiters have positions that are not available right now, but will be opening up soon. These employers want to identify candidates and get them in the pipeline now so they can fill those positions as soon as possible when they receive hiring approval.
  5. Why don’t all employers accept paper résumés?

    A federal regulation called the OFCCP Internet Applicant Rule tells certain government contractors how to gather and retain job applications via the Internet. Because of the Rule, many contractors require that applicants use their online systems and not submit paper résumés.

    • OFCCP is the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, an agency of the United States Department of Labor’s Employment Standards Administration. The OFCCP enforces laws prohibiting employment discrimination by federal contractors.
    • Some employers that are not bound by the Rule do not accept paper résumés simply because they have put their entire application process on the Internet. One great advantage to applicants is that large employers can easily route the online résumés of desirable applicants to the appropriate divisions, offices, plants, etc.
  6. If they won’t take my résumé, shouldn’t I have stayed home and registered online?

    There is great value in the time you spend talking to recruiters, even if you can’t hand them your résumé.

    • You have a great chance to make an outstanding personal impression. A person who presents himself/herself extremely well at a booth may even get an interview for a job opening that is not on the recruiter’s list.
    • You have a chance to learn about the recruiters’ companies and their job opportunities.
    • You have a chance to network with the recruiters. You can ask a recruiter what it’s like to work at his/her company, and how best to navigate the company’s application process. You can ask the recruiter to take down your name and phone number or email address, and ask for his/her business card so that you can follow up.
  7. What if the employers are in industries that don’t interest me?

    An employer’s primary industry or company name does not necessarily indicate what openings the company is trying to fill.

    • A drugstore chain may be recruiting for positions in transportation and distribution.
    • A brewery may be recruiting for jobs in information technology.
  8. What time should I arrive?

    Feel free to try and arrive a little early to get near the front of the registration line, or you can choose to arrive a few hours after the event starts and avoid the crowd.

If you have a question that is not answered here, email us at